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VII. SOUTHWARD THRUST: BATTLE OF KENESAW MOUNTAIN

April 30th A.D. 1864. it was a little cooler & nearly clear. We was relieved & got to camp after 9 A.M. The 9th Ky had to be mustered for pay before they relieved us & they had orders to have their pay rolls made out for the month Pay till tomorrow evening. They had Grand review yesterday. General Howard & Wife & daughter & several other ladys was said to be present. & the boys said the Devision passed a very good review. I believe we have 27 regts in our devision now & the most of them is present with the comand & we have 78 regts in the Corps. We had orders to be ready for muster at 11 A.M. We was mustered. I went to writing. It rained. I received a letter from home. We drawed 5 days rations. I traided some coffee for custard pies as the mess dont use all of our coffee. & so I traided for 4 pies. We had a very nice dressparade. The brigade band had come daybeforeyesterday. & they came over & played for us. & it was a interesting parade. WM B Ellis & Frank Gellif came to our regt. They will soon have suttler goods to the regt. I writ after dark. It thundered & threatened rain. We retired at taps.

May 1st A.D. 1864, Sunday. it was raining. & had rained nearly all night. I don some writing. At 8 A.M. we had comp inspection. It had stoped raining. Captain Howe was officialy notified that R.M.Gosney of our company was Commissioned as 1st Lieutenant & was in a darky regt. We had potatoes issued to us. The officers had orders to pack their things in their valices & have them ready. & all the camp equipage & every thing that could not be took along, ready to be took to the station on the railroad till Monday morning. I washed & boiled all of my cloth. It was a beautiful afternoon. We had orders read on dressparade for only 3 teems to be alowed to Division head quarters, & 3 to Brigade & two to the 19th OVI & two to the 17th Ky & one to every other regt in our brigade for the next campaign, & for the troops to carry 3 days rations in their haversacks. & so we expect to have a little fight in ours soon. Wm B Ellis's suttler goods came up. I helped the Lt make out some discriptive rolls, & retired after 10 P.M.

May 2nd A.D. 1864. it was a beautiful morning. We fixed up our camp equipage to send back. We dun up our overcoats & sent them back in a Barrel & box. There was two men called from our company to go as pioneers to march in front of the Batallion or Brigade each day. We practiced in target fiering. & it clouded up & comenced raining at 10 A.M. & after noon it cleared off again and was cooler. I received two letters. Our mess got a lot of oysters & had an oyster supper. I writ a good deal. We drilled. We drawed some clothing. I drawed a Ponchoes rubber blanket as the one I drew at Murfreesboro (the first I ever drew) was wor out. I retired at taps. I had to get up in the night for I had the Diarrhea for two days & it was geting bad.

May 3rd A.D.1864 it was a beautiful morning & was cool. There was a heavy frost. Samuel Wilson & Elijey Anderson was sent to the convelescent camp. I put my time in at writing. The orders was for us to start at noon. We drawed some potatoes & we was ordered to be ready to march at 12 M. Silas Martin was detailed to drive an ambulance at head quarters as he was not able to march & cary a gun since the Chickamooga battle. At half past 11 the Genl sounded & we got every thing ready to march. & at half past 12 M we started our brigad in front & we marched toward Ringgold. Mathew Chandler took his plase in the line of file closers & the boys said that he was appointed sergeant. But it was not read on dressparade yet. & I was also told that Corporal Vinsant F Browning was appointed sergeant & James C Dunlap was appointed Qrderly. It was all don in a very still way. I dont know anything about it as yet to a certainty. We marched about 8 miles & stoped to camp at 15 minuts after 4 P.M. We eat a little supper & retired after taps. I had to get up in the night.

May 4th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at half past 4 A.M. & the Genl sounded at 5. & we fell in line at half past 5 & wated for the two brigades to go in front of us. & we started at 15 minuts after 6 A.M. & marched very slow. & at about 8 A.M. we passed out of Tennessee in to Georgia. We stoped very often & got to Catoosa Springs at about noon, where there was about 52 differant springs. & I heared about 20 differant names of the Springs, but I forgot them. & they have a good many buildings around them. & in time past it has bin a plase of resort & pleasure where the rich persons met for pleasure & pass time. There was ball Alleys & other buildings for amusement. Corps head Quarters was put up at the Spring. & we went about a half a mile & stoped to camp at 15 minuts after 12 M. about 3 miles from ringold. Having marched about 8 miles today. We heared that the rebels was advancing on us & had come out from Tunnel hill. & that their pickets was in sight. & we had orders to have reville at 4 in the morning & fall in line & remain untill day light. I retired after 9 P.M. & it was a cool night.

May 5th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. & we stood in line. I treated the boys to the Cigars. As they claimed it of me as I had never treated them since I was appointed Sergeant. I got $1.00's worth for my part. It was a warm day.. there was a good many Generals & officers passing by the road. I put my time in at writing. We got orders to be ready to go on picket. We could hear some shots on the picket line. The news came that the rebels had evacuated Richmond. We have 22 privats in ranks now & 2 corporals & 4 sergeants & 2 musitions & so we have just 30 men to draw rations for in our company. We started out on picket at 15 minuts after 12 M. & we had to advance the picket lines about 3/4 of a mile. & we deployed skermishers & then stationed the pickets. & we heared the skermishers fiering on our right. Our right joined on the left of the 14th A.C. They had bin advancing their pickets & skermishing all forenoon. & that is what the Genls had bin riding around so much all forenoon for. They was straightening the line. & Genl Thomas was riding around to see the position of the troops & the lines. We was sent out on out post to stay 12 hours. We traided a little coffee for some milk. We drawed 3 days rations. There was some shots fiered during the night & at one shot a man yelled manfully. We was relieved at 1 in the morning.

May 6th A.D. 1864. we was called in line of battle at half past 3 A.M. & I was sent to camp to get some things for Captain Howe, as the teems was ordered to report at Ringgold & unload the baggage & load the teems with rations. It was thought that we would advance. I returned & we traided some shuger for milk & I had as much as I could eat. The 9th Ky came out to relieve us at 8 A.M. & we got to camp at 9 A.M. & the talk was that we would start out about noon. We received mail. I received a letter. The news in the paper was that our army had crossed the Rapidan at several differant points. & had drove the rebels from their marks. The army had moved out the 3rd of May. It was a very warm day. I done some writing. There was several officers passed by again, & everything indicated a move in the morning. We drawed some rations. We had orders to get our guns in shooting order & be ready for a fight tomorrow. We retired after 8 P.M.

May 7th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 3 A.M. & we had orders to be ready to march at 5 A.M. The Genl sounded at half past 4 A.M. & the troops was mooving out for we could hear the drums & bugles on our right & left sounding forward. It was a very foggy morning & it was clear. At 6 our brigade started & we was all ready & our regt was in the rear of the Brigade. & we moved out toward Tunnel Hill. & we moved very slow & studdy as the 1st Div of our corps was on the same road I think in our front. We could hear skermishing on our right on the other road. The road was strewed with knapsacks & overcoats & woolen blankets & a great many other things which was two bundlesom to carry on such ocasions. At 15 minuts till 9 A.M. we heared the report of artillery about 4 or 5 miles off to our right & front. We saw where the rebels had cut trees to blocade the road. & it had bin cut out or a road cut around by our pioneers. At half past 10 A.M. we formed in line of battle & formed close collumn by division at half distance, & our artillery went in front & took places on noals. & we stacked arms & could see the rebels moving. & see their signal flag at a distance. It was a very warm day. & dry & dusty. At 10 the cannonading had seaced. & we could not hear any fiering at all. I was bothered with the diarrhea a good deal.

At 12 M we deployed column & started & we heared some more cannonading. We passed by where the rebels had bin camped & where they had a gallos up where they had hung someone. There was a grave close. & another where no one was burried in it. We got to Tunnel hill at 15 minuts after 1 P.M. I saw where the railroad runn under the hill. It was the first tunnel I ever saw. We marched up on the hill & stoped to reast having marched about 6 miles. & we soon got orders to make ourselves as comfortable as possible during the night & go after water by detachments. It was the hotest day that we had experienced yet this spring. & there was a goodeal of smoak & dust so we could not see very far. The skermishers Said they had to skermish about a half an hour prety hard. & the 21st Ky had one man killed & 3 wounded I heared. & I think that if the rebels would have stood they would have made a good deal of work or fighting for us to get up the ridge. But I think they will give us a tryal tomorrow at Buzzard roost. The rebels could be seen tarring up the railroad in the gap in front of us. & our batterys shelled them. We understood from what we heared from the officers that our division had to charge a ridge tomorrow. Which looks to be a mile high to flank the rebels out of a gap in the mountain. & the 14th A.C. is on our right & Stanleys Div was in front today & I think they will be in the rear tomorrow & Sheardons div on our left & the 23rd A.C. still to the left & one Div & one brigad of cavelry on their left. I received a Letter from Levi P Huntzinger. He was well & so fat he said he could hardly get to the office & back. There was a rebel spy came around through our lines. & the boys thought it was one of our officers riding around. As he had our officers uniform on. & he went to the picket lines & told the boys he wanted to go out & water his horse. & the boys saw him ride out to the rebels & they rode out of the woods to meet him & they all road off. There was an orderly at Genl Howards head quarters whose name was Andrew Jackson Thombson. He was hunting for Jacob Huntzinger from Franklin Co. near Laral P.O. Indiana. & he heared of me & thought I was the one. He was anxious to find him. I retired at half past 8 P.M. & slept fine.

May 8th A.D. 1864, Sunday. reville sounded at 4 & the Genl sounded at 6 & soon the bugle sounded to the colors. & we was ordered to leve our things for we was only goying to make a recranoitring expidition. We layed around till half past 8 & then we formed close column at half distance. & at 15 minuts till 9 A.M. the cannons fiered the signal for us to forward. & we started & the skermishers was engaged amediatly. & as we advanced over the hills & the rocks in the woods there was a heavy skermishing to our left & front a fiew rods at half past 9 A.M. & we could see the rebels moving to the left on top of the ridge. & we thought we could see artillery up there. We could hear a fiew shots on our right at a distance. We stoped at a little branch & saw some prety red fish with very bright spots on their backs. We stoped a long time. & the hevy fiering had seaced in a half hour. & there was a fiew shots on the skermish line on our right & left all the time.

At 12 M. we could see some rebels runn to the left & we saw them fier at our men. We went back a little ways & stoped & stacked arms & we eat a bite of dinner & we heared that our men had whiped old Genl Lees forse in the east & was driving them. & at 2 P.M. we started & marched down the valley. & at 15 minuts till 3 P.M. our company & company F of our regt was deployed as skermishers. & we marched along till we was geting tolerable near the gap & then we stoped & our left extended up the side of the ridge or mountain. & at 10 minuts after 4 P.M. our artillery opened on the rebels in the gap. & there was a heavy skermishing on the right of the gap. We heared the cannons a good ways to the right. I think it was our right wing. At 15 minuts till 5 we moved ahead a good ways but had but a fiew shots fiered. The rebels artillery comenced playing on our men at 10 minuts till 6 P.M, or the first I heared today. The rebels would set up on the bluff & hollow down to us. & we was under the bluff or hill & could not charge it. & it was two far to shoot at them to any certainty or affect. Captain Howe sent me in to the Brigade for infermation before dark as our left was exposed very much. & it was nearly a 1/2 a mile from the skermish line back to the Brigade. & we was liable to be cut off on our left. & we was told that we would be relieved soon & for us to let our left swing back to hold our line. & after dark we was told that a picket line was formed in our rear & that we was liable to be fiered into & we was ordered to bring in the skermishers. & we called to the pickets as we advanced back to the line so they would not fier in to us. We got to the brigade at 9. & sent men in to get our things where we leftin the morning. We could hear a good deal of cannonading on our right till after dark. Our men got nearly in the gap at buzzard roost. Our things came till 11 & we retired to sleep.

May 9th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. & we had orders to put on our rig. It was very smoaky. So much that we could not see very far in the woods for it looked wors than Indian summer. The rebels sharpshooters was fiering at us from the top of the ridge & bluff & talking down to us. The Genl sounded at 15 minuts till 6 A.M. At 6 there was a very brisk skermishing comenced on our left & rear as we was in line. & at the same time our artillery I think was on the hill or mountain & comenced shelling them & it stoped the skermishing to a great extent. & the rebels was seen marching to our left on the ridge. At 8 A.M. we fell in & reformed our lines & closed column by divi at half distance. & there was a brisk skermishing in our front & next to the ridge. At half past 8 A.M. we had orders to file knapsacks. & at 15 minuts till 9 A.M. the front line of our brigade comenced a heavy fiering. & it extended I think to our left to Willich Brigade. We moved forward & stoped at the foot of the ridge. & our artillery from our rear passed shells over us. One of Genl Woods staff said that Genl Hasens brigade on our right was geting near the top. I heared that we had no orders to go on the top of the ridge. & I supose the line was ordered to stop where it was & remain there, for the hard firing seaced & there was a brisk & heavy skirmishing cept up all along the lines. & our artillery was playing on them at times. I was tiered & sleepy & I slept a good nap. & the boys told me that the skirmishing was cept up & had not ceased at any time. We was prety close to the skirmish line. Some of the boys came up from the rear & told us they could hear heavy musketry in volleys at a great distance to our right when they was away from the nois.

At half past 2 P.M. the mail came. & I received a letter from the girl I loved so well & it cheared me very much. The cars came up to tunnel hill twise today. At 4 P.M. we started & marched toward the gap on our right & we went about a mile & deployed & reasted & the firing could be heared on our right at a distance. & I think our right had been gaining prety fast. The skirmishers cept up a very heavy firing. The rebels was up on a bluff firing down. & lots of balls passed near us & fell in ranks but no damage was don to our regt. But several of our brigade was wounded. & lots killed I believe. At 6 P.M. there was a heavy musketry & cannonading to be heared on our right near us. & It seemed like our men was in the gap. & the yankies seemed to be driving the rebs up the end of Rocky face ridge. & we moved up near where we stayed last night & stacked arms at half past 6 P.M. & sent a detail after the knapsacks. & the firing cept up tolerable heavy & regular till 8 P.M. & then it was very quiet all along the line. Our brigade band was along & played at times during the day to cheer us. & at night, at 11 o'clcok we was awaked up to draw rations. & we heared some shots along the ridge. & after we layed down I could hear shots at every time I awoke from my sleep. The talk was that Genl Davis was in the gap with his men.

May 10th A.D. 1864. revill sounded at 4. We was up & preparing for any emergency amediatly. We could hear some sharpshooters firing at our men from the ridge. There was skirmishing along the line after 6 A.M. The order was for us to fill our canteens with water. At 15 minuts after 6 there was considreable skirmishing comenced on our right. At 20 minuts after 6 A.M. the Genl sounded. The sky was overcast with clouds & the air felt like rain. & at half past 6 A.M. it comenced raining. Jeremiah Foley & James Cotten was sick & reported to the Docter. Sergeant Vinsant F. Browning & John Shoemaker of our company was detailed for pioneer when we left camp at McDonalds Station & they ar called every morning to the squad which is detailed from the whole brigade. & they have picks & spaids & axes to carry & they dont march with the regt. But they march in the rear in the time of action so to be ready to cut roads for batterys.

At half past 7 we could hear some cannonading on our left flank. It seemed to be in the 23rd A.C.s front across the ridge from us. The sharp shooters cept shooting at us & they threw balls in our camp. The cannonading ceased in a half hour on our left. It did not rain very much. Our artillery comenced fiering on our right at 20 minuts till 9 A.M. A squad of men fired into our own men on our right. I did not hear the result. The news came that Genl Grant had drove the rebels 10 miles one day & captured the wounded & dead & was still in persuit. There was 3 cheers given. Before 10 A.M. our artillery comenced shelling the ridge. At 10 A.M. it comenced raining brisk. The shelling soon ceased. & at 12 M it stoped raining. & the batterys in our rear comenced a heavy shelling again for a while. The word came that our men would have the rebels surounded till tomorrow if they did not leave. When I was eating my dinner one of the sharp shooters balls lit about 6 feat from me. It had passed close by me. At 1 P.M. the rebels had a peace of artillery away back in the gap & fired shells at our men. We heared that Genl McFerson had got in the rear of Dalton & tor up the railroad. One of the 9th Ky who layed in line with us was severly wounded in the left elbow. & a good many balls fell close to us as we layed in the woods. For the rebels cept a constant firing at us down from the ridge. 91 of our division was said to be wounded yesterday. At 15 minuts after 5 P.M. Lewis McFaden of Com E of our regt was severly wounded in the left elbow.

At 7 P.M. we started out on picket. & we went up in front of the ridge & 6 comps was sent out as sentinals to stay till day light. & it had bin raining ever since 6 P.M. & at 8 it thundred & lightened & rained in torrents & it continued so till 11 & we got awful wet. & there was heavy skirmishing on our left & a considreable skirmishing all along the whole lines all night.

May 11th A.D. 1864. at 4 our company & 4 others went out to relieve the sentinals & we had to lay close behind logs & trees & rocks. For the sharp shooters cept up constant firing at us. & we was close to them & it was cold & misting rain. & we layed shivering like we had the ague. & we suffered very much with coald. & the rebels just pored the balls down over us. At 9 A.M. I heared cannonading on the right & there was some cannonading all day. It rained a little. We was relieved at 3 P.M. & went to the reserve from the skirmish line. It rained nearly all afternoon. The skirmishing was cept up all the time. Our batterys shelled the rebels a good deal before night. We was relieved at 8 P.M. & as the brigade had moved we all came back to tunnel hill & stoped to camp. & the sky was geting clear. & the wind blew very cold. & we put up our tents & retired a little befor 10 P.M. & slept fine for it was the first time we was from under fire of the rebels sharp shooters since the morning of the 8th.

May 12th A.D. 1864. we got up after day light & it was very coald & windy. & the rebels was still fiering & had bin all night. It cleared off. I went to writing. We was ordered to lay out camp, & we could see the 23rd A.C. goying to our right. & the 14th A.C. was said to be moving to the right further. Our Artillery was playing a little on our right during the day. & at 20 minuts after 1 P.M. the Genl sounded & we was hurried to get ready. & In 15 minuts we was marching to our left, leving Jeremiah Foley in camp. & we marched up where I supose the 23rd A.C. had bin & we stacked arms in line of battle & went to puting up baracades & works of rails & logs to receive a cavelry charge & it was said that the rebels was trying to make a breake down the valley where we ar & in a fiew minuts we had good works built & we heared skirmishing in our front ever since we got in hearing & we saw some of our wounded cavelry come in. We got some papers. & the news was good in the papers. Genl Buttler was inwith a days march of Richmond & the communications south was cut off as Butlers forces had burnt the railroad so that Genl Lee could not get reinforcements. Lee had fell back inwith a mile of Richmond. & Genl Longstreet severly wounded. & our men had took a good many prisnors. Our cavelry soon came in saying the rebels was two many for them to hold in check & they thought the rebels was trying to make a raid to Chattanooga. Genl Stone came in & said that the rebel force was weak. & could not do much. We soon had good works to defend ourselves behind. We got word that we would stay all night. & we retired after 8 P.M.

May 13th A.D. 1864. we got up very early. & it was cool & everything seemed very quiet.

But I think before night there will be a good deal of nois to be heared if the rebels is hear yet. At half past 6 A.M. the Genl sounded & we got word that the rebels had left & was not between us & Dalton. & at 15 minuts till 7 A.M. we started & went a little ways toward tunnel hill & was stoped. & our band played for us. & we got orders to counter march. & we went back & went in rear of 2nd Div & we had to wate for them to get strung out on the road. We could see the troops marching along the ridge towards the gap which was called Buzzard roost gap. & the ridge Rockey face ridge. & the report was that Stanleys div had went through the gap yesterday evening. We marched around the base of the ridge & marched down the valley back of the ridge to the rebels first line of works till half past 9 A.M. & the rifle pits was the best I believe that I have seen that the rebels has made. They had cut trees & put brush for entanglement in front of the works & stakes dug in the ground. & we turned to the left before we got to the gap. & we passed out through their works & went down to the Knoxville & Dalton R.R. & the rebels camp was thick & the rebels had sheds & bark shantys for shelter. & it seemed that all they had to shelter them from the rain was just what they could construct & fix up without tents of clawth. The roads was very dusty where it was traveled so much.

At half past 12 M we got to the edge of Dalton & stoped to reast. & the boys found a good many knapsacks that the rebels had left. I threw my oald knapsack away & took one as it was a good one. Dalton is a tolerable prety little town. The County Seet of Murray County. We started after a good reast after the rebels. As the citezens said they would make another stand about 14 miles from hear towards Atlanta but I dont think it will amount to very much if they do stop there. For I think if they cant hold such a plase as the one they left hear they cant hold one nearer than 30 miles from hear & they cant hold that near after we have a fiew days to get the railroad repaired. To my opinion. We marched very slow for there was teems in front of us. We was marching towards Resaca & we stoped at 15 minuts till 6 P.M. & had orders to get supper in a half hour & be ready to march further. We eat a little & started but did not go very far. For we could hear skirmishing on our left on another road. & we was guarding the Ammunition train. We stoped at 3 P.M. & had orders to lay down to sleep right where we was. We had marched about 12 miles today.

May 14th A.D. 1864. we got up at 4 A. M. & was ready to start. We drawed 3 days rations. There was some rebels guarded back to the rear. Some of our division was march past us. I was in fine spirits as I have bin on this whole march & I feal sure of hearing soon of great sucess hear & in the army at Richmond or the one moving to Richmond. I think the rebels will soon have to give up the ghost for I do believe that God is working this great & most important caus in his own way. & I am intierly willing to throw myself in Gods hands to be protected believing that he will be with me. At half past 10 A.M. we started our regt in the rear of the whole division as train guards. We could hear distant cannonading. We got the mail as we marched along. I received a letter from Levi P.H. He talked like they was goying to be sent up along the railroad to guard. We marched along very slow. For the teems got along very slow. At 12 M we stoped near some rebels breastworks & put out pickets having marched 3 miles. The teems was parked. & we could hear a good deal of cannonading on our left & front. & it soon got plainer & was a perfect roar. & it only seemed to be a little way. It was said to be the 23rd A.C. & our A.C. layed to the left & was not engaged yet. The boys could hear the musketry very heavy at a distance. But I did not go away from the regt to hear it & there was two much nois to hear it where I was. I layed down & slept a little. It was cloudy & sprinkled rain a little. Our division had ammunition ordered to them out of our train. The word was that the cars came to dalton yesterday & they came up further this way today. The cannonading was further off & not quite so constant at 2 P.M. But before 3 it was a perfect roar of artillery. & before 4 P.M. it had ceased again a little & at 4 there was considreable cannonading on the left further than it had bin. & I think it was the 4 A.C. engaged on the left. It was said that our colonel had orders sent back to him to hold his position unless he was ordered to fall back a little way & so we was not in front. But I set & listened & thought of the Boys & my heart was tuched with compassion for them & I prayed god to lead them safely & triumphantly through the bloody strugle & to give them victory over the enemy & to prepair the ones whos lot it might be to fall, for heaven. The cannonading continued & at 7 P.M. there was a considreable cannonading began on our left & front. It seemed to be where our division layed. & it seemed to be very heavy. & we could hear musketry & we got orders to be ready to move. & Genl Hookers corps was passing to the left. For the rebels had drove our men, it was said & was charging our batterys on the left when the heavy cannonading was heared. We started with the Ammunition train. The cannonading ceased at 8 P.M. We marched over a mile toward the front & stoped & we layed down to sleep at 10 P.M. & it was a cold clear night.

May 15th A.D. 1864, Sunday. we got up at 4 A.M. & it clouded up a little. All was quiet till 15 minuts after 5 & then we heared two cannons. We got orders to report to the Brigad. & we started at half past 5. We could hear the report of several cannons at a distance to the right & front of us as our brigade was not in line of battle nor had bin ingaged yesterday. For our brigade was the reserve brigade of our Divi & Genls Willichs & Genl Hasens brigades was engaged yesterday. The news from the east proved that a very hard battle had bin fought, & that Warren & Genl Warner & Genl Sedgwic was killed. Both comanding corps. At half past 7 there was a considreable cannonading & musketry for some time. The cannonading was continued. Some of the hookers corps was passing . I saw George W Evans of Comp B 70th Regt Ind. Vols. He was well. We drawed 20 rounds of cartrages to the man. The cannonading cept up very regular & constant in our front, & we could hear musketry very heavy. At 15 minuts till 10 A.M. it seemed like the rebels was trying to charge our battery. The 23rd A.C. was moving to the left & it was said that the rebels was trying to move to the left up the Coosawatiee river. At half past 11 A.M. we was called in line & an order was read to us from the Secretary of war that Genl Grant had killed wounded & captured one whole Division after 4 days hard fighting at Spottsylvania Court house. & the rebels had abandoned their works. & our army was in persuit. At 10 minuts after 11 A.M. a very heavy cannonading & musketry comenced on our left in front & lasted about 10 minuts. At 5 P.M. Brig Genl Willich was took by us in an ambulance wounded in his left breast. At half past 6 P.M. the word came that Genl Willich was dead. The ball was said to have passed near his heart. He will be missed a great deal in his brigade for he cared so much for his men & I doubt whether his plase can be filled by his equal. The news was that Genl Wooker was driving them on our left & that on our right was crossing troops over the river. There was musketry all day at intervals & cannonading all the time. I retired a little before 9 P.M. & the cannons was still to be heared at a distance during the night. But it was two far to hear musketry.

May 16th A.D. 1864. we got up at 4. & the cannons could be heared before we got up & after we got up the cannonading seemed a good way off. The report was fals that Genl Willich was dead. The report was that the rebs had crossed the river. At 7 A.M. the bugle sounded. & we started & marched down to where the battle was fought. & we saw several killed men. & it was impossible to say how many lines of breastworks the rebels had for they was thick all along the hills & knobs & every plase that one could be put to any advantage whatever. The ground was very hilly & rough & almost all in the woods. There was a fiew fields with oald trees in them. There was a good many marks of musket balls. & I never saw the like for marks of shells & solid shot & grape cannister. I saw oak trees not less than 10 or 12 inches in diameter, shot so they fell to the ground by one ball, & I saw one green pine tree not less than 20 or 22 inches in diameter shot through the center 3 times or 3 differant places. & other places was marked by the shells. The ground was plowed up very much. It beat anything I had ever seen. The trees & bushes was so shot up that the leves was wilting.

We marched about two miles & came to the main road & railroad, & the yankies was so thick that we could not all march along. & we stoped to let others pass along. Calumbus Hancock came up. It sprinkled rain a little. I writ some. Our men captured some meal & peas in town & there was some brought to us. The carrs come up to this little town at 2 P.M. & we fell in line & started at 3 P.M. & marched through Resaca. & saw a great many holes where the shells passed through the houses. The rebels had a good deal of fortifications. The whole earth was lined with rifle pits & little forts. Our men had took a good many prisnors. I saw Joseph Fraker. He was well. We crossed the Coosawatiee river on the oald wagon bridge. As the rebels did not suceed in geting it burnt down although it was afire & our men put it out. & the railroad bridge was burnt about 100 yards. But our men will soon have it up again & ready to run the carrs across.

We stoped at 15 minuts till 4 P.M. just across the river & started at 5 P.M. & put out a heavy skirmish line on our left flank to march as we did. We marched down the railroad. We could hear a fiew cannons. We marched through tolerable level country. & it was a perfect wilderness & thicket all through the woods. It was thicker than any harricen [?] I ever saw I believe. & the greatest part of Ga is that away as far as I have seen. The part of the battle field that was in the woods was a perfect thicket of under brush. We stoped to camp at 15 minuts till 8 P.M. about 4 miles from the river. We baked some corn cakes. The news was that Genl Grant had took Richmond with 40 thousand prisnors. It was said that Adjutant Ritter of our regt received his commission as capt of company C, & Sergeant Major Thombson Dun received his commission as Adjutant. We retired at 15 minuts after 9 P.M.

May 17th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 15 minuts after 3 A.M. & it was a raining a little. We drawed 3 days rations. We have had plenty of rations ever since we have bin on this march. It consists of crackers & meat & shuger & coffee & sometimes salt but we nead but little salt. The musketry could be heard aften on all night. & this morning I heared cannonading at a distance. The Genl sounded at half past 5 A.M. & we started at 7 A.M. & it was a raining. We heared a fiew shots from artillery. We marched into Calhoun at 8 A.M. 6 miles from Resaca. Calhoun is a nice little plase. The Co Seet of Gorden Co. We stoped as our front had to skirmish all the way. We could hear the skirmishing in front. & it seemed that the rebels was contesting every foot of ground. It stoped raining & we marched along slow. & at 3 P.M. the rebels fiered into our tellegraph operaters teems as we was on the railroad. & the dirt road run about 3 or 4 hundred yards from us to the left. & the troops happened to be a little behind on that road & the teems passed over the railroad & went over outside of our line of flankers. We had them put to flight in a fiew minuts. & it rained & we soon heared a heavy skirmishing on our left. We had skirmishers on our left & right & we was formed in line of battle at 4 P.M. & could see the rebels firing at the yanks. But our line lay under the hill from us. We heared a fiew cannons on our left but it soon ceased & we was ordered to build barracades along the little noals & hills in the fields of rails. Soon a brisk skirmishing was heard on our right & front. There was a tolerable heavy skirmishing on our left nearly all the time. It stoped raining. At 20 minuts after 5 P.M. the welcom sound of our artillery was heared on our left opening on the rebels. & we could see the rebels passing to the rear every once & a while. & at half past 5 P.M. the rebels battery on our right opened on us, or rather the line in our front & some men was wounded & some killed. & we was ordered off ove the knobs where we was & some of our artillery was ordered up on the noals & played on the rebels 4 differant ways. & on our left the artillery just roared & the rebels batterys was soon silenced & there was a tolerable heavy firing cept up on our left & front & it was said that the rebels was trying to save a large train that had not got across the little crick yet. The Artillery ceased at dark & we was ordered out on picket & there was a heavy skirmishing cept up till after 9 P.M. & then all was still. I only got about 3 hours sleep. We was awful sleepy but knew the importance of staying awake & being very prompt. We had come about 8 miles from where we started.

May 18th A.D. 1864. we got up at 4 & was ready to march or fight as the case might call for. It was very foggy. At 7 A.M. we was ordered in from picket & marched. & we marched right on. & the rebels had a very good position & breastworks. But the rebs was gon. & we just pushed on into Adairville (a very nice little town). & stoped at 9 A.M. & formed in line of battle. & our Comp was called out as flankers to skirmish. & we marched around for some time to find the plase desired for us. We hered skirmishing in the front. & Genl McFerson had heared our firing on his left last evening. & he did not think we was in town. & he advanced on the ridge overlooking the town. & he thought to flank the rebels but discovered when he got in sight that it was the yankies in town. & he marched in town, & passed & went in camp. & I heared that Genl Woods was rebuked for crowding the center yesterday. & it is thought that if we had not crowded the center so that the flanks might have took some prisnors & a train. There had bin a good many wounded brought in town last night & we saw the amputated limbs laying around, unberried & some dead rebels. I writ some & at 15 minuts after 1 P.M. we started our brigade in front. & we turned to the right of the railroad. & the brigade formed in line of battle. & we went along very slow. & we found that the roads was so close that the lines of skirmishers laped & so there was no use for us to be out there. & we marched a good deal faster than the other Divisions. & so we was called out again. & we marched through very bad thick woods & it was hard on us. & we could hear skirmishing in our rear on the other road on our left. For they was not advancing as fast as us. We could see the rebels on our left was two far to shoot at. At 6 a brisk skirmishing comenced on the front line of the skirmishers as they raised the top of a hill. & it cept up till 7 P.M. & the troops went in camp. We had marched about 8 miles. & at 8 P.M. we was relieved & went to the thick woods to the camp. I received a letter from home. & it was cheering to me to sit on the ground & read by the dim camp fire & read the sacred lines from my own fathers hand. We retired after 9 P.M.

May 19th A.D. 1864. I heared the Genl sounding at 20 minuts after 4 A.M. & I got up. & it was another Brigade. Our Brigade Genl sounded at 5. & we started & marched to the road & wated till the other brigades passed. & at 8 we started. We heared that Genl McFersons troops went into Roam at 12 M. yesterday. It was a very hot day. & we marched tolerable fast. At 15 minuts after 10 A.M. we marched into Kingston which has bin a nice little town in Cass Co where the branch of the railroad comes in from Roam. It is 59 miles from Atlanta & 79 miles to Chattanooga by railroad. We marched through town & stoped to reast. & we heared a brisk skirmishing in our front. We could hear skirmishing to our left & some cannonading at a distance to our left & front. We started after 12.M. & went a little ways & found the 1st Division of our corps was ahead & in line of battle. & at 15 minuts till 1 P.M. our artillery comenced playing on the rebs. We could hear the rebels artillery. We heared a brisk skirmishing in our front & our artillery was playing on them very fast. It was very dusty & warm. & at half past 2 P.M. we started & our batterys had advanced & we went & formed in line of battle on the right of the other troops. & we could hear the artillery on our left that had come up on the other road. It was near Hookers troops. & we soon started & marched in column at half distance about a mile in the thickest & rockeyst wood imajineable. & the cannonading ceased. & the boys said they had bin shelling the rebels train part of the time. We reasted & awaited orders. We had swung the right around. & all was quiet & at half past 4 P.M. we was ordered to about face & we went back a little ways & stacked arms & had orders to stay all night. & at 15 minuts till 5 P.M. the bugle sounded & we marched out & we could still hear cannons on our left. & skirmishers was firing in our front & we was spread out over more ground as we had got two close togeather. Thinking the rebels was gon further. & our Artillery comenced firing very brisk at 15 minuts till 6 P.M. Our artillery fires in volleys & makes the earth tremble. Our artillery men I supose lost sight of the rebels & we all started about sundown to advance the lines through the fields to a strip of woods. & our skirmishers was engaged amediatly. & our Artillery gained another position & used it till the smoak & dark prevented them from seeing. Our skirmishers was very buisy ingaged & the 14th A.C. joined on our right & the 17th Ky of our brigade was skirmishing. & the 86th Ind & 59th OVI was the front line of battle & the 13th O.V.I. was to suport the skirmish line. & we was deployed & cept in good suporting distance. & as we marched along captain Hannah of Comp H of our regt was wounded in the right hand & right thigh & the balls fell fast around us. At dark we stoped & the skirmishers ceased at 9 P.M. in our front. & we could hear a little skirmishing on our left. We built a little barricade. We stacked arms & got supper. We had marched about 9 miles today. I heared that there was one capt & 3 privats killed in the 17th Ky & 30 odd wounded. & one wounded in the 9th Ky I heared. I am not positive that there is that many.

May 20th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at half past 3 A.M. & we drawed 3 days rations & at half past 5 A.M. we went out & relieved the 86 Ind & we heared that the cars came to Kingston last night. At 8 A.M. we got orders to make shades & make ourselves as comfortable as possible. As we expected to stay nearly all day. I slept a good deal. We drew some beef. We drawed two days rations. We heared some cannonading on the right. I don some writing. Some of the 82nd Ind boys came over to see us & we went back with them & saw several of the oald acquaintence & had a good chat & returned at 8 P.M. The cars came up to where we was. & it was said that the 44th Ind & 19th O.V.I. of our brigade had come up.

May 21st A.D. 1864. we got up at 4 A.M. & at half past 6 A.M. the regt was called in line. For some ones had bin snapping caps & firing their guns & all men with unloaded guns was to be cept out of a months pay. As we had bin ordered to load our guns. & we had not got orders yet to unload our guns.* & at 7 A.M. we got orders to get ready for inspection & draw the loads out of our guns. I don some writing. The cars came up again. We got word that we could wash some cloth. We heared that the train was loading with 20 days rations. & we thought that we would soon start again. We fell in at 5 P.M. for Inspection. I was tolerable weak & I went to the Docter & got medicine for the Diarrhea . & I got very sick after night.

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* "Forty-three empty guns discovered. Non-commissioned officers reduced to ranks; privates fined one month's pay." - HISTORY OF THE 79TH REGIMENT.

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May 22nd A.D. 1864, Sunday. reville sounded at 4 A.M. I was not very much better but the docter said that I would reast today. & he would not give me any medicine. I don some writing & sent off letters fool of memorandom. We drawed rations for to do us 5 days. & the word was that the things that the boys did not want to carry could be sent back to Bridge Port. & it seemed like they was fixing for a hard march. It was a very hot day. & I expect it will be very hard on us to march for we will nearly smuther in the dust. & we have such loads of rations to carry & 60 rounds of Cartrages to the man besides a gum blamket & a tent & a woolen blamket & a change of shirts or do without them. We retired after 8 P.M. & slept fine.

May 23rd A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. I heared the Genl sounding in differant corps. & some troops was moving. I don some writing. I was looking to move at any moment. We got orders at 10 A.M. to be ready to move out at 12 M. I felt very weak & was not very well. At 12 M. we started from near Cassville, the Co Seet of Cass Co. & we marched a little West of South. & Captain Ritter took charge of Comp C & Adjutant Dunn comenced acting adjutant. & Corporal Munhall is Sergeant Major & Coln Knefler took charge of the Brigade. I saw that the teems had the mark of the Corps & the division & some men had the badge on their hats as it was an order issued. Genl Order No. 62 April 26th A.D. 1864 the badges & flags was to be changed. & the flag of our corps (the 4th corps) is to be silk with yellow fringe or bunting, & read with blew fields; size of field 2 feet squair, same as Department head quarters with gilt or embroidered Eagle in the field. 3rd Div 4th A.C. same as 2nd Division with an adition of a third white bar 3 inches wide running parallel to the staff through the field. & the badge for our men to wear on their hats for 4th A.C. is an Equilateral triangle. Read for 1st Div. White for 2nd Div. & blew for 3rd Div. & other corps have their marks. We passed through a beautiful part of the cuntry. The roads was awful dusty & it was a hot day & we crossed the Etowah river on a covered bridge at half past 5 P.M. which I think our men saved by dashing on the rebels. We turned more east. We got in camp at 9 P.M. & had marched about 9 miles. & we retired after 10 P.M.

May 24th A.D. 1864. reville at half past 3 A.M. & we prepaired for a march before 6 A.M. the Genl sounded & at 15 minuts after 6 we started & we saw a good deal of beautiful corn but it neaded work very bad & there was some wheat in bloom. We passed through some good country yesterday. We crossed New harling Stream. We marched a little way & stoped for the other troops to pass before us. & after 10 A.M. we started again & marched on by roads & through woods. & it was a very hot day & dusty & a little cloudy. We marched very slow & passed over very hilly country. & at 15 minuts till 1 P.M.we heared several shots of cannon in front. & at half past 1 P.M. we stoped for dinner. & at half past 3 P.M. we started & marched over & among the Racoon hills. For it was called Racoon gap but it was over hills & hollows through the Altoona Mountains. It was an awful plase for an Army to pass through. We stoped at half past 5 P.M. to camp having marched about 10 miles. & it threatened rain. & we put up tents. & it comenced raining. I washed good & washed my stockings & felt better. The troops was marching till dark. & the teems did not get up till in the after part of the night. We heared that the 4th & 14th & 20th A.C.s was with us goying to the right to flank. & the 23rd & 15th & 17th was moving along the railroad to the works to make the rebels think that we was all coming to their front. We retired at 8 P.M. & it rained during the night.

May 25th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. & it was a little cloudy. The troops & teems was passing all the time. The Genl sounded 10 minuts till 10 A.M. & a man from each company was detailed & left to wate till the teams came up. & then bring up shoes. & one man from each company was sent with Lt Mounts to forriage along the road. We got a little meat that was said to have bin forriaged. At 10 minuts after 11 A.M. we started & marched southward. It was a very hot day & nearly clear & it made us swet. & we only went a little way & stoped. We started at half past 2 P.M. & could not march very fast as the roads was so bad. & we went over hills & hollows & through the worst of country. We was behind two batterys. We marched slow till 15 minuts till 5 P.M. We heared a heavy cannonading comence in our front. & at 6 a heavy musketry was heared. It was Genl Hookers Corps. & we was geting near him. We got to Pumpkin crick or river at dark. Our men had drove the rebels away. & we crossed on a bridge. At 7 P.M. it comenced raining hard. & the firing ceased. & we went on about 3 miles. & we saw lots of wounded coming back. For they had fought about 4 miles from the bridge all the way. At 10 o'clock we had orders to lay down by the road & make ourselves as comfortable as possible. We put up our tent & retired at 11 P.M. having marched about 10 miles. & we was tiered & we had orders to have reville at 3 in the morning & form line of battle at 4 A.M. It did not rain any more.

May 26th A.D. 1864. reville at 3 A.M. & at 4 we formed in line of battle. & had roll call. We saw a good many wounded goying in of the 20th A.C. At half past 5 A.M. we heared a good deal of skirmishing in front & at 6 A.M. we started & marched about 1 and 1/2 miles & formed in line of battle on the left of the skirmishing. & at half past 7 as soon as the skirmishers was sent out in front of our Div they was fired on by the rebels, & we loaded our guns. & James Hague acidently sprained his ancle & could not march in ranks. & we was in an awful thicket of woods & underbrush & it was all woods as far as we could see. It was a clear day with the exception of a fiew lowflying clouds. The boys all seemed to be cool & brave & resolute. & the victory certainly will be ours. The rebels shot balls over us & in our ranks among us. One ball lit inwith 3 feet of where I sit. There was a lively skirmishing cept up till 11 A.M. & then we started & our artillery comenced firing. & the skirmishing was not very heavy. The news was good from Genl Grants army. The news that he had achieved a great victory & drove Genl Lee across the South Anna river. We did not advance very far till we stoped & on our right & front there was more skirmishing than in our amediat front. The 23rd A.C. come & joined on our left. & we advanced the left a good ways. & the skirmishing was cept. & at 20 minuts till 4 P.M. the rebels battery comenced shelling our men. The shells exploaded tolerable close to us, but they soon ceased. We could hear cannonading on our left at a distance. We drawed a fiew shoes & stockings. At 7 P.M. we went back a little ways & had marched about 3 miles. We drawed 3 days rations for to do 4 or 5. The firing ceased after dark. We retired after 8 P.M.

May 27th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at half past 3 A.M. We drawed 2 days rations of beef. At 20 minuts after 5 A.M. our artillery opened in our front & in five minuts a very heavy cannonading comenced on our right. & the rebels comenced shelling our men & a peas of shell lit near us. There was a skirmishing nearly all along the line & a very brisk & regular cannonading was cept up on our side. It was a very clear hot day. At half past 9 A.M. the bugle sounded and at 15 minuts till 10A.M. we started & marched to the left, & formed a line to flank the rebels. & we advanced the line. & there was a little skirmishing in front till we got the lines formed & then we marched by the left flank & went through the woods till 3 P.M. We struck a little road & a little cleared farm. & captured a courrier. & several shots was fired. We could still hear the cannonading on our right. At 4P.M. a heavy cannonading comenced at a distance to our right. & we thought we could just hear the heavy musketry. & at 15 minuts till 5 P.M. there was a brisk skirmishing comenced in our front & some cannons fired a little way to our right. & the skirmishing cept up all along the line as far as I could hear & was increasing to a heavy firing. & at 15 minuts after 5 P.M. we advanced & there was a heavy firing of musketry. & the rebels shelled us & throwed grap & canester. & at 15 minuts till 6 P.M. a charge was made on one side. & I dont know which as there was 2 or 3 lines in our front, or we thought there was. But there was only one. & the others had bin left to the right further. As we had to string out to ceep the rebels from flanking us & we did not know we was left second in front. & we was moved forward amediatly & the rebels shell the woods miserably while we was passing through. & we advanced about a quarter of a mile & only found a part of a regt in front. & they was holding the rebels skirmishers in check. & they had bin clear across a field & the rebels had 3 fires on them & the rebels charged on them & they had to fall back. It was the 78th Pa & we moved forward to the edge of the woods & took a fiew rails. & went up a little ways in the field. Up the rais & laid our rails down while under a prety heavy fiering. & we layed down & comenced a brisk firing. & the rebs had a fire on us from 3 differant ways & they killed some & wounded several but as we was in the bend in the advance the most of the balls lit in our rear far enough to miss us nearly all the time. But had we bin back a little way we would have suffered a very heavy loss. Their batterys ceased & we was out farther than any troops to our right or left. The 9th Ky was on our left. & the 19th O.V.I. on our right. The best of troops. & to the right & left of the lines was considreable refused. While we was firing Alexander Robinson of our company received a shot somewhere in the left side of his body which caused his death in about two hours. He was wounded about 7 P.M. A spent ball hit my right shoulder but did no harm as my tent was on my shoulder & my knapsack strap. We had just 19 men ingaged in our company & one pioneer back & so excused by the docter to march at will & 3 left the line & got lost. & the 2 musitions was back a little way while we was ingaged. I think the other regts suffered a good deal wors than we did. We cept up a brisk firing till the bright silvery starts comenced twinkleing in the blew sky. & there was a perfect fogg of smoak of burnt powder but we could see the flash of the rebels guns on our left. But they had got so far back behind a rais in our front that we could not ingage them & then we held our fire. The most of the boys got out of Ammunition. & Lieutenant Batchelor had charge of Co K in our regt. & he was severly wounded in the left arm. The firing ceased between 8 & 9 o'clock except a fiew shots. & we layed & had a fiew skirmishers in front & some of the wounded was took back.

The skirmishers give word that the rebels was advancing. & we thought maby they was only coming out to geather the killed & wounded, & we was ready & at about 10 they had got so close to our men on our right at a vacant plase that our men ast them who they was ( as they was not sertan but it was our men coming to fill the vacant place) & the rebels ast them to surender & fired a volley in to our men. & our men fired & found that the rebels was two near around them & give back & we had orders to about face & we marched out & a heavy shour of balls fell over from the right among us. & we came back about a half mile to our men to where they was building works. & we was ordered to go back to a saw mill. The rebels followed us up a little ways & shelled us. & we went to the mill & turned to the left & wandered about a mile & stoped to sleep at 1 A.M. having marched 8 miles during the day. & we layed down to sleep after 1 A.M.

May 28th A.D. 1864. I was awaked at 4 A.M. by the rebels shells exploading near us. We drawed ammunition. We was ordered to build some works & we did so. & we had nothing to eat since yesterday morning early but dry crackers. & we was not alowed to build fires. I went to the rear a little ways after we built our works & fryed some beef. & there was a brisk skirmishing in our front & left. It seamed to be nearer on our left than it had bin last night. & we heared cannonading on our right at a distance. We heared a considreable skirmishing all along the line. & it could be seen when we found out where we had bin a good ways toward the front & had layed intending to hold the works till we was almost cut off from our corps. We would have bin captured I recon in ten minuts if we would not have bin ordered back But as we got the order in time we marched back in splendid order considering the woods. The skirmishing was cept up regular & at half past 2 P.M. we was ordered to move & change our front a little & build good breast works. & we did so. & it was a very hot day. & we had a very bad place to work on & very fiew tools. The skirmishing was not cept up so brisk after 3 P.M. At 5 p.m. our artillery comenced shelling the rebels on the left & front of part of the 14th A.C. Our brigade loss was not as heavy as the other part of our Division. The 59th O.V.I. of our brigade said they had 62 men killed wounded & missing out of 8 companys. & their Colonel & Adjutant was missing on friday evening the 27th. & our regt (79th Ind) had 2 killed & 9 wounded. The 9th Ky had 3 killed & 19 wounded & some missing. The 19th O.V.I. had 11 killed & about 50 wounded & missing. The 17th Ky had about 30 killed & wounded. The 86th Ind Colonel Dick injured by a peace of a shell striking his sword & scabbard likely saving his life. & about 20 wounded. The 13th O.V.I. 5 killed & 29 wounded & 25 missing. & it is said that our Division lost about 1500 killed & wounded & missing in the last evenings ingagement. But it is thought a greater part of the missing was not captured but will come to their comands yet. & it was said that Genl McFerson on the right had let his skirmishers be drove in when the rebels charged. & they fell back to the first line of works. & then they fell back from there. & the rebels came up. & our men had batterys masked & the men all ready to suport them. & our men opened fire on the rebels & then charged them & drove them 2 miles killing & wounding & capturing a good many. We had bread alone for supper. We drawed two days rations of fresh beef & it was about anough to do one day. We retired near our works after 8 P.M. & had orders to have reville at 3 in the morning.

May 29th A.D. 1864, Sunday. we was awakened by a heavy firing at the skirmish or picket line in the night. & was called up in a hurry. & when the firing ceased we layed down again. & at 20 minuts till 3 A.M. the firing comenced again & we was called up in a hurry & ordered to put on our rig & do up all of our things & have breakfast till 4 A.M. There was a brisk skirmishing all along the line. & it was cept up all along the line all forenoon on our right & left but not in front of our brigade pickets or skirmishers which had 7 posts & two centenals at a plase. A fiew shots of cannon was heared on our right. The rebels shelled the woods a little at 2 P.M. & some peaces of shells passed near our line. The news was that Genl McFerson had took 500 prisnors & killed & wounded under 2,500 the day he drove them 2 miles. We was ordered to go out on picket. & at 5 P.M. 5 companys started & went out to the front & 2 comps went out & 3 stayed on reserve. We could hear constant skirmishing on our right & left. We had no meat for supper. As the two days rations only made us two messes. There was a heavy cannonading on our right at a distance. & we could hear musketry & there was skirmishing cept up all the time. & after dark I had just got to sleep & there was a heavy cannonading comenced at a great distance to our right & it was cept up for a good while. & a heavy skirmishing was cept up all the time all along the line. & we was looking every minut for the rebels to charge on the skirmishers & drive them in. But after a while it ceased a little. & then it would comence along the line again. & that a way it was all night. & we could not sleep for we had to watch very close to be ready for any emergency.

May 30th A.D. 1864. we was awaked at half past 3 by the cannonading on our right & left & we had been asleep but a little while for the cannonading was cept up all night only at times a little while. & a very heavy skirmishing would break out along the lines every little bit. Our pioneers was at work nearly all night to our left. We was chilled through as it was a very cool clear night. Our 3 comps went out to out post at 6 A.M. & sent out 14 centanels to stand 4 hours on centanel line. Some of Genl Willichs Brigade had lost 900 killed & wounded. & one of the regts the 49th O.V.I. of their brigade lost 204 killed & wounded nearly half the regt killed & wounded besides the missing the day we was engaged. & the way they came to loose so many the rebels had breastworks & cut bushes & when our men came in sight the rebels held up their hats & a white flag & said they surrendered. & our men was ordered up. & when close to them they raised their guns & fired on our men. & our men layed down & fired & stayed there till dark. & then sliped back leving the most of their killed & wounded. The word came that 3 divisions of the 17th A.C. came up (as there was only one up) last evening & took position last evening & night. & the rebels tryed to drive them. & our men was ready for them & gave them a rough reception. & it was said that Genl Reusaw had come up with 20000 men to our assistance. I took out our company on centanel line at 10 A.M. & cap came & visited the line & said if there was an advance made on us he would come out amediatly. The skirmishing was cept up on our right & left all day. I slept a good nap after I was relieved from centanel line while the woods was roaring with the skirmish shots. We was relieved & got to camp at 7 P.M. & we drawed 3 days rations except meat. & had orders to be ready to move. & after 9 we started & marched toward the picket line & we marched around in the woods to join the line of other troops near the picket line to hold a ridge. We got lost & did not find the right plase till after midnight. & then we built as good works as we could without tools. As we was ordered not to use axes or make any nois. We layed down to sleep when we got don building the works.

May 31st A.D. 1864. there was considreable skirmishing all night & morning. At 8 A.M. we had to move, as we did not have our works in the right plase. & we did not mor than get our lines dreast where we wanted to put our works till the rebels charged on our picket line. They charged twice or three times on Genl Willichs brigade pickets & did not drive them, as our men sent a regt to reinforce the skirmish line. & we heared they charged several times on Genl Scofields picket line which was on our right. & Genl Willich was on our left & our Brigade picket lost about 1 killed & 7 wounded. & the rebels did not drive our men but the skirmishers held them in check & then repulsed them. We worked very hard to get logs & rocks & made works. & when the heavy firing would comence we would get our guns a fiew minuts & then work hard again. There was a fiew cannons to be heared. & at half past 10 A.M. the heavy skirmishing had ceased. & we had got prety good works till 11 A.M. & there was considreable cannonading on our right a little way. It was a very hot day. & the boys felt fortigued & had lost so much sleep that they was in a poor condition to work but they seemed in good spirits & worked with vengeance & power. The rebel skirmishers shot balls over where we was in line. The skirmishing was cept up all day. The news was good in the papers. We received mail. I received 5 letters. We drawed some beef & retired after 8 P.M. & slept. We was aroused once by a heavy skirmishing on our right but soon it ceased & we slept.

 

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June 1st A.D. 1864. we was awaked to get breakfast at 4 A.M. The skirmishers was still firing. I went to writing. The mail went out. Manker took charge of the mail. He is mail carrier of our regt now. The skirmishing cept up all day. & a considreable cannonading on our right at times. We drawed a little beef. We had but very fiew rations. We retired after 8 P.M. & it was the first time I had layed down without my acoutrements on for a long time. & we just layed down on a tent & put a tent over us so if we would be called up in a hurry that we could be at hand with all our things ready in a little time.

June 2nd A.D. 1864. we got up after 3 A.M. The rebels had aroused us once by shooting. I went to writing after breakfast. & it was a very hot day. & at 11 A.M. we heared it thunder. It was a geting cloudy & soon it comenced raining hard & it hailed & we had put up our tents when it comenced thundering & we layed in our tents & got very wet & mudy. There was some firing along the line all day & some cannonading. The rain cooled the air & made us feal as fresh as fish in clean pure water. At half past 3 P.M. a brisk cannonading comenced several miles to our left & it got harder & regular & it was thought that it was our men that had went to our left yesterday. & today they was taking a position no doubt. The heavy cannonading on our left did not last long but a fiew shots was heared till night. We got beef. We retired after 8 P.M.

June 3rd A.D. 1864. we was awaked once in the night by a brisk skirmishing that lasted for a fiew minuts. We got up after 4 A.M. It was cloudy & misting rain. I don some writing. There was some cannonading on the left. We got orders at half past 9 A.M. to strike tents & pack knapsacks & get our accouterments on & get close to our works. & the word was that the skirmishers was brought in to draw the rebels in to our works. We layed & all was quiet only on the right where the works was in sight of each other. The pioneers on our right was very buisy at work. Some shots was fired by artillery on our left. At half past 12 A.M. we got orders to put up our tents & pool off our rig & make ourselves as comefortable as possible. Ezra J Hicks of our company & our mess was very unwell & had simptoms of a fever. We drawed 3 days rations of bread & coffee & shuger & salt to do 4 days. & one days rations of pork. It rained a little. We heared that the rebels was moving to our left. I went to the 22nd Ind & saw several of my oald acquaintance & returned after dark. I was detailed for alarmguard. We was awaked once by firing before midnight.

June 4th A.D. 1864. I got up at midnight to go on alarm guard & stayed up till daylight. It comenced raining at 3 A.M. There was a right smart skirmishing. At half past 8 A.M. we had orders to strike tents & be ready to move & it was still raining. & we went to the right & took a plase where one Division of the 14th A.C. had bin & they went to our left. We put up tents & had orders to clean off the ground. & we did so. & the rebels balls fell in where we was as we layed on the side of the hill behind works. But the works would not shealter us without being very near the works. I writ some. The rebels comenced shelling our works at 2 P.M. But their shells did not hurt us. But was very near us. We made the works better when the rebels stoped shelling us as they was very poor where we came. & at 4 P.M. the rebels charged on our men on our right a little ways. & was repulsed. The news was in the paper that the siege of Richmond had begun. I felt reumatisem in my boans. We got orders after 8 P.M. to go on picket. & after we got our tents down & wrung the water out (as it was raining) we got word to wate till they tryed to get another Brigade to relieve our pickets where we left in the morning. & after 9 P.M. we got orders to put up tents & stay where we was. It rained a little all night. & the pioneers went out to work at the picket line & the rebels tryed to make them quit work by firing. But they did not.

June 5th A.D. 1864, Sunday. we was awaked at 3 A.M. to get breakfast. We built our works better to ceep the shells from affecting them much. It still rained a little. I don some writing. At 8 A.M. our pickets saw the rebels pickets running & leaving & our men followed them & they had left all their works to our right & front & I dont know how far to our left. We heared a little cannonading to our right. I went to the battle field where Genl Woods Division had fought on the 27th of May. & I dont think I ever saw as much marks of musketry in my life as there was in front of the rebels breastworks where part of our Division had charged up to them. & in front & on either side of where we had bin. I saw where Allexander Robinson was burried. After a view of the awful sight I returned & got my shirt washed. & I got leaf to go & see Lieutenant Batchelor. He was at our Division hospital about 2 miles off & he was geting along fine. He was in the best spirits I think I ever saw him. He had his arm saved by resection. They had only took the boan out of his arm & had not amputated it. The surgeon had took 3 inches of the boan clear out & left non in that space. The Chaplin came in & sung & read the 6th Psalm & prayed for the wounded. I returned & received a letter from Levi P. Huntzinger. He was still at Nashville. Capt Howe came in with James Hague & I. I sent out 5 letters with mail. We retired after 8 P.M.

June 6th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 3 A.M. & we got orders to be ready to march at sunup. The Genl sounded at half past 4 A.M. & the bugle sounded at 5 A.M. & our brigade started out. The roads was muddy, & we marched Eastward. Calumbus Hancock had bin sent back to the hospital. & captain Howe was very unwell & was hardly able to march. It was very muddy. & we marched through very bad ground & through the woods & fields & out of the roads & in the roads. & at 10 A.M. we stoped to reast. & had an order read from Genl W. S. Sherman, conserning the men leaving ranks & helping the wounded men off ove the field or men with arms, or to leave ranks while the firing continued, to help any wounded man off ove the field. & those who straggled back or run back in time of ingagement or battle was to be taken up by patrolls & others that would be sent for such men. & ar to be shot on the spot if any resistance or impudence is showed & they ar to be severly punished. & to be shot if their conduct is two bad. & the Docters ar tosee that there ar not two many skulking about the hospitals & the hospitals ar to be near the battle field & sheltered by shape of ground & not by distance. The musitions & men detailed on purpose to carry the wounded of ar to have a strip of white cloth tied around their left arm to distinguish them & ought at all times to have a pass from their commanders showing what duty they ar on. & all officers ar to be treated the same as the privats if they disobey any of these orders. I think it is a good order & it is to be carryed into affect by commanders of each department. The day was very hot & soultry & it was desperat hard marching. We heared some cannonading in front & to our right at a distance. We stoped at 15 minuts till 1 P.M. & it looked like rain. & we put up our tents & we had marched about 8 miles. We got some beef. It only rained a little. We retired after 8 P.M. & slept fine.

June 7th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. We got up & it was a nise day. We got orders at 8 A.M. to wash our cloth & clean our guns & be ready for Inspection in the afternoon. I washed my cloth. We got full of chiggers. We drawed 3 days rations. I writ some. The mail came in. I received two letters & Levi P Huntzingers Picture. Captain Howe & E.J.Hicks was very unwell. It rained a little. We had inspection. We retired after 8 P.M.

June 8th 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. I don some writing. We drawed one days rations & a little soap. The first that we had drawed for over a month. The most of the troops layed of regular camp. It rained a little. At 3 P.M. the men that had not went veterans of the 13th O.V.I. started home, their time being nearly expired. A.H.Terhune came up to the regt. We got mail, & sent out mail. We drawed some shoes & stockings. We retired after 8 P.M. & it rained a little. The chiggers bothered us so we could hardly sleep.

June 9th A.D. 1864. reville sounded before 4 A.M. & we was expecting to move. I writ some & I put my time in at reading. Wessley T Shepard of our company came up he had not intierly recovered from his wound yet. We drawed a days rations. It was a very warm day. Benjamin F Long was taken very sick with a hot fever & is very low. We ar about 3 miles South East of Acworth, a little town on the railroad said to be in Cobb County. & our wounded & sick ar all taken there now to be sent off on the cars when they come up. We retired after 8 P.M.

June 10th A.D. 1864. reville sounded before 4 A.M. & we had orders to be ready to march at 8 A.M. The Genl sounded at 7 A.M. & the troops comenced moving out. & it clouded up & at 8 A.M. it comenced raining but did not rain much. The bugle sounded & we eat dinner. Benjemin F Long was sent to the ambulance train. I had a bad cold & fever in my head & felt bad & unwell. The bugle sounded & we started at 15 minuts after 12 M. & it rained hard & we marched very slow & heared cannonading in front & to our right & left on other roads. We stoped to camp near the 70th Ind at 6 1/2 P.M. having marched 2 miles. It stoped raining & we put up tents & drawed beef. & we still heared cannonading. I saw George Evans. He was well & saucy. The mail came in. We retired after 11 PM.

June 11th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. & we had heared cannons firing in the night. It rained very hard. Isaac Higgens came to see me. He is fat. We heared cannons fire during the day. At 15 minuts after 12 M. the Genl sounded & it comenced raining hard. & at 12 1/2 we started & marched one mile to the left & stoped. & a cannon fired a little to our right & front at 1 1/2 P.M. At 3 1/2/ P.M. we got orders that we would stay where we was. & we put up tents. & it rained very hard. We drawed beef. & after 4 P.M. there was several shots fired from our artillery till night. They could see the rebs. We could hear the skirmishing. We retired after 8 P.M.

June 12th A.D. 1864, Sunday. reville sounded at 4 A.M. It had rained nearly all night & continued to rain. We heared some cannonading at a distance. We got word that Wm Carter of our regt who has bin hospital steward for some time was Lieutenant of Comp F & Stanley Clark of our comp who was hospital steward of second brigad of our Division is hospital steward of our regt now. The talk was that Lt Jones had received commission as Captain. There was a brisk skirmishing along the lines. There was considreable cannonading a good way to our left & we was expecting to move all the time. It rained hard nearly all day. We drawed beef. I had no crackers & would have bin very hungry if my captain would not have bin a man of charity & willing always to help when in his power. He gave me crackers & tells me when I want to eat of his crackers to help my self as he lunches in the tent with me. The rain continued to fall all the time in torrants. We retired after 8 P.M.

June 13th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. It had rained all night. & the pickets had fired all night. At 7 A.M. we heared the cars blow [locomotive whistle]. It continued to rain in torrants till 10 A.M. We drawed 3 days rations. We could hear some cannonading all day at a distance to our left & skirmishing along the line. I writ some. I heared that Lt Stubs was commissioned Captain. We retired after 8 P.M.

June 14th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. There was cannonading on the left & distant skirmishing. John Anderson was detailed to drive team in the suply train. I don some writing. At 11 1/2 A.M. the Genl sounded & there had bin cannonading all along the line for some time for some time & there was considreable cannonading on the right. It was nearly clear. E.J.Hicks & B.F.Long was very unwell. At 12 M. the bugle sounded & we started & marched to the left & front & heared considreable skirmishing in our front. & it was thought we was goying to charge a noal where the rebels was. & we moved about a mile & formed in line of battle. & there was troops in front of us. & the skirmishers cept up firing all the time. At 3 P.M. we moved back about 3 rod & stacked arms & had orders that likely we would stay. We got mail & papers at 3 1/2 P.M. A feble charge was made & we got ready but I supose it was only one skirmish line advanced. At 15 minuts till 6 P.M. our batterys comenced firing from the top of the ridge that we was on & they was firing from our right & left. We drawed beef. We put up tents & retired after 9 P.M.

June 15th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. & we had heared skirmishing all night & some cannonading & some musket balls passed over us. After daylight a brisk cannonading was heared on the left. I don some writing. All seemed quiet in our amediat front. We heared that the rebels had left our front. We could still hear cannonading on our left. The roomer was that the rebel Dezerters said that Genl Polke was killed by a peace of shell yesterday. There was a considreable cannonading on the left all forenoon & a fiew shots on the right. We drawed cartrages. We drawed 3 days rations & made a requisition for clothing. & had orders to march. At 2 1/4 P.M. the Genl sounded & we prepaired to start. The cannonading was cept up constant on our left. & it was rumored that our men had took a noal that comanded part of the rebels train at 2 1/2 P.M. We started & marched to the front & heared scirmishing in front. We stoped in mass in a field as the 1st Division relieved our Divi from the front. The skirmishing was very brisk in our front at times & was geting further off. At 5 1/2 it seemed like the skirmishing was renewed with vigor. & some of our batterys had got position on the ridge to our right & comenced shelling the rebs. & the cannonading was not so constant on our left after 6 P.M. as it had bin all day but we still heared several shots. At 6 1/4 P.M. the skirmishing had increased to a brisk firing. & at 6 1/2 we started & marched toward the front a little way & then had orders to countermarch & go in camp & we countermarched & then had orders to go further to the front. & we went toward the skirmish line & stoped at 8 P.M. on the side of a high noal & had orders to make coffee. The skirmishing was brisk & near us. & a fiew shots from artillery was fired from batterys near us on our right & front & left. We drawed a days rations of bacon. & it was rumored that our whole line had advanced about 2 miles today. We had come that far. The report was that Genl Buttler had took Fort Darling with 1200 prisnors. We retired at 10 P.M.

June 16th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. & we got orders to get breakfast. & the skirmishing had bin very brisk in our front all night. It was cept up all morning & at 5 A.M. the batterys from our right & left shelled the rebels. The news in the paper has bin for several days that old Genl Morgen was making a raid in Ky. & this morning the paper states that his force was whiped & badly scattred. & it is thought now that his raid is don now. Our men advanced the skirmish line & we have two lines of breastworks in our front. & our batterys has bin shelling the rebs train & works all along the line & we could see their works & batterys from the top of the noal that we ar on. We got mail. I received a letter. Our batterys was still but little during the day. & at times the whole earth seemed to quiver from the heavy cannonading. For our men could see the rebs at times. At 4 P.M. the rebels shelled us a little but soon their batterys was silenced. For our guns was fired by volleys & every other way. We had orders to get supper before dark so to have no fire after dark. The skirmishing continued till after night & a fiew shots of artillery. We retired at 9 P.M.

June 17th A.D. 1864. reville sounded at 4 A.M. & the skirmishing still could be heared but was further off. & our Genl sounded at 5 1/4 A.M. The artillery could be heared at a distance to our right & left & near us on our left. The bugle sounded & we deployed column & started at 7 1/2 A.M. & we did not go far till we stoped & we heared cannonading in front & on our right & we started again & went on through our front lines of works & saw whar the woods was scared up with musket balls & cannon shot. & we marched over the rebs works which was very good & would have bin hard to charge. At 10 1/2 A.M. we moved out & relieved the 1st Division of our corps. & we was formed in line of battle & loaded our guns. & there was some skirmishing in our front & when we got our lines completely formed & ready for an advance our regt was on the front line of battle. & the 19th O.V. I. on our right & the 9th Ky on our left. & the skirmishers cept up brisk firing & our boys that clim trees could see the rebels batterys firing & our artillery was firing & the rebels had to leave their position on the right. & our men followed them up with infantry & artillery. & our artillery got position & the rebels made the pool back after a heavy firing for the rebels had a side or cross fire on our batterys. It sprinkled rain a little. At 3 P.M. the 19th O.V.I. & 17th Ky went out to our front to skirmish. At 4 P.M. a very heavy cannonading comenced at a distance to our left & soon a good deal of musketry was heared. & the batterys fired over 20 shots to the minut. At 4 1/2 P.M. we moved to our front close to the skirmish line & the balls came all around us & we put up a little barracade of limbs. & we got mail. & I received 2 letters. At 6 1/4 our batterys had got position. One to our right a fiew rods & two batterys to our left a fiew rods. & they fired nearly as fast as they could by volleys. & it made the earth tremble & made our bodys jar when they was firing. For part of them was parrots & part Rodman guns & make a very shrill cean report harder than thunder. & it seemed like the rebels balls did not come over us so much. & I think they had left a little way or had layed down. & layed very close & still. At 7 1/4 the rebels shelled us some & the firing had nearly ceased. & at 7 1/4 our men moved out the skirmish or picket line & had a warm time. & at 8 1/4 we moved out & built works & layed down & soon drawed a half gill of whiskey to the man. & I was detailed for alarm guard from 12 to daylight. & we was aroused at 11 by a brisk skirmishing not having got to sleep yet. & after it was still we layed down again. & I got up at midnight.

June 18th A.D. 1864. the camp was aroused at 1 by a brisk firing at the picket line & it was thought that the rebels charged on our pickets. & we had orders to be ready to march at 4 A.M. & the word was that the whole line would advance along the whole army. At 3 A.M. it comenced raining. & before 4 A.M. we started without any breakfast. We advanced out our regt to suport the 9th Ky who was deploying as skirmishers in our front & it was raining very hard. & we advanced & the skirmishers fired very brisk & our line all advanced on our left & our front. & we gained the top of a little hill. & the skirmishers at the bottom of another to our left all along. & to our left which was Genl Willichs brigade. & I dont know who to the left of him. They was very sharply engaged. Our skirmish line halted. & the rebels shelled us. & to our left several charges was made. & our men took 2 or 3 lines of the rebs temporary works for skirmishers & got in close contact with the rebs. & then each side held their works & cept up a constant firing. & the rain fell in torrants. & at 8 A.M. the rain ceased a fiew minuts. The musket balls & shells was mor plenty. & some was uncomfortably close. In a fiew minuts the rain comenced as hard as ever. & I dont think I ever saw it rain any harder so long, for it continued till 3 P.M. At 11 A.M. our regt deployed & took the skirmish line & layed around the trees & logs watching & firing & the balls came very close. & 3 men of our regt was killed. John Rine of Comp C & James Ford of Comp F & John Hollans of Comp K. & several slightly wounded. At 5 P.M. we was relieved & came in to the works that we had built last night & saw where some men had been killed of our Brigade in our works for the rebels shelled nearly all afternoon at times. & our batterys had roared all day by volley & every other way. & once one of our batterys had to move back on the acount of the rebels having range first of them. & the musketry was as constant as I ever heared & did not cease all day on our left. & it is said that our loss was tolerable heavy & the rebels must be much hevier. When we got to the works we eat supper & tryed to dry our things as well as we could, for we was awful wet. & it still rained a little. We got our tents up & retired after 9 P.M. & we drawed 3 days rations after we had layed down first & a half gill of whiskey to the man. & we still heared the roar of musketry in the front or on the skirmish line. & same shots of artillery. It was still raining.

June 19th A.D. 1864, Sunday. we got up after daylight having slept fine. The rebels had quit firing about 1 1/2 o'clock in the morning. & it is well anought for it is said that our artillery was all ordered up to the front & took position & throwed up works around them. & today it would have bin very unhealthy for the rebels. We got orders to march & we heared some skirmishing in front. Stanleys divi went in front of us. & we started at 8 A.M. At 8 1/2 we stoped. Our artillery opened on the rebels in our front & played tolerable brisk. We could hear cannonading on our left along the line. We started at 10 A.M. & passed through the rebels works which was in shot distance of where we was on skirmish line yesterday in the woods. They was sollad works. We stoped again & heared cannonading on our right & left at a distance. & in our front a little ways at 11 1/2 A.M. it comenced pouring down rain very hard & before 1 P.M. it stoped raining & we eat dinner & still heared the skirmishing & cannonading. The papers & mail came in. & the news was good in the paper from Genl Grants army. The paper stated that it was rumored that Grant held Fort Darling & had a mashine called the Devil goying up the James river clearing the torpedoes & obsticles out of the way of the gunboats & that Genl Lees suplys was cut off south of Richmond. & he had to fight or surender. If this news is all true it is very good. At 15 minuts till 3 P.M. our men advanced & there was a very brisk skirmishing & cannonading & we started at 3 1/4 P.M. & went a little way & formed in line of battle & stacked arms. & we was fronting towards Merrietta & the big knob or mountain called Kinsew [Kenesaw] was to our left a little ways & it seemed that our left wing had swung clear around the mountain Kinsew from the sound of the artillery. At 4 1/4 P.M. the artillery a little to our left & front fought a duel & of all the roar I believe I never heared the like for ove course they loaded & fired as fast as possible. It did not last long for the rebs had to hawl their artillery to the rear, or stop firing anyhow. It rained again. We drawed cartrages & at 6 1/4 P.M. we was ordered in the woods & went in camp having marched about 1 1/2 miles, & put up our tents & had orders to be ready to march at 4 in the morning. It was reported that Genl Jefferson Davis was killed yesterday on the skirmish line. He was a good Genl of our army. We retired at 9 P.M. & there was a brisk skirmishing. We slept fine.

June 20th A.D. 1864. we was awaked before 3 A.M. & prepaired to march & the skirmishing was still goying on & had bin all night. We heared but little cannonading till 8 A.M. & that was to our left at a distance but the skirmishing was cept up in our front & to our right & left as far as we could hear all the time. We got orders that we could pitch tents but not leave quarters. We saw a good many prisnors taken by at a quarter till 11 A.M. Our artillery on our right comenced firing. I writ some. Some artillery fired in our front. The Genl sounded at half past 12 M. The paper stated that the rumor was that the rebels was evacuating Richmond. & our forces ocupied Petersburg & the news seems to be good. We started at 1 1/2 P.M. & went to the right & stoped in a field & stacked arms & received mail. & I received a letter. It comenced raining after 2 P.M. & at 2 1/2 P.M. our big guns 20 Pdrs opened fire to our left on the hill. It did not rain much. At 4 P.M. the artillery to our right comenced firing. Then to our left they comenced a brisk firing at different points all along the lines & in our front but not all of the peices opened fire. At one plase to our left we had about 23 pieces all massed. Soon they got to firing very brisk to our left. I think it must have bin very warm for the Johney rebels. At 4 1/4 a charge was made in our front. I dont know which side advanced yet. But they made it very lively for a fiew minuts. & volleys was put into one side or the other. & the artillery fired several times. & soon the rebels comenced throwing shells & sollad shot at our men & batterys. & they passed clear over & came where our brigade was massed. & some exploaded & the pieces fell among our brigade. One sollad shot passed through a stump & jared several of the boys who was laying behind it. We got orders to move to the right, & we went to the 20th A.C. & relieved them on our right. It rained hard. & our artillery to our left played very fast. & the rebels shelled the battery that we was behind before we moved. Very hard. & there was very heavy firing to our left. & charges. For we could hear the yells. & it was said that the rebs first charged on our men. & then our men repulsed them & charged them. It was cept up so till late in the night. We did not find out whether we would stay certain or not till nearly 9 P.M. for we had to ceap moving to the right a little way. We put up our tent & eat a little & retired before 10 P.M. & the heavy skirmishing was still to be heared.

June 21st 1864. we was awaked at 3 A.M. & told to get breakfast & be ready to move till 4 A.M. There was some skirmishing. & at 4 1/2 a fiew shots of our artillery was throwed over to the rebs from our left near us. It rained a good deal. The skirmishing was tolerable brisk to our left. & a good deal of cannonading. I writ some. At 12 M. a charge was made but I dont know which side charged. It was to our left. The rebels had shelled the men to our left a good deal. & it was said that the rebs charged on our men 5 times last night to get a hill which our men ocupied which would have bin a good position for the rebels. There was brisk skirmishing & cannonading on our left & it was raining very hard. & yells was to be heared & the rebs charged on our skirmish line. Our artillery was used as fast as possible. The firing continued & several charges must have bin made. I think it was our men charging back on the rebels after they had repulsed them & was still following them up. Our artillery in our front shelled the rebels out of their skirmish works. & our skirmishers took the works. & our artillery, after a heavy firing, ceased to some extent, for our men was geting out in range. & at 2 1/4 the 17th Ky went out to the front to suport the skirmish line. & a great cheer was heared to our left. & the firing was cept up as brisk as ever & was still geting a little further away. Our skirmishers I think ar nearly as thick as a line of battle from the heavy skirmishing. At 3 P.M. our Genl sounded. & we struck our wet tents & started at 3 1/4 P.M. & went out in the field & put up works of rails & tore down houses. & the boys used the logs & everything. Even the furniture that was all shot up. & the rebs shelled our men to our left. There was a good deal of skirmishing in our front.

We got orders that we would stay. & we put up our tents, as it was raining a little. William Higard of Comp C was wounded in the thigh or hip. & several of the brigade was wounded & some killed & lots of balls came over us & around us. We drawed 3 days rations & got some desecated potatoes & some vegitables & a little whiskey. We retired after 11 P.M. & the skirmishing was cept up all along the line.

June 22nd A.D. 1864. we got up at daylight & had orders to be ready to march at 6 A.M. The skirmishing was as brisk as it had bin all night. At 6 A.M. the cannons was heared on the right. Wm A Ritchardson of my mess was very sick & was sent back & James Hague complained a good deal. At 9 A.M. the rebels comenced a considreable cannonading from the top of Kinsew . We could see the flash of their guns. & it seemed like they was tolarable large guns. It was nearly clear & very warm for us, as we was in a field. I writ a little. At 12 M. we got orders to march & in 15 minuts the skirmishers on our right advanced & cept up a very brisk skirmishing & some yells. After 2 P.M. a brisk firing comenced to our left & front. But it did not last long. At 3 1/4 our pioneers got a plase fixed for some artillery in our front & the artillery fired several shots. At 4 P.M. we got a fiew spades & shovels & went to throwing up dirt against our works to ceep the rebels shells & sollid shot from hurting us. & we expected they would shell the battery in front of us. & our artillery on our right comenced firing. & at 5 P.M. our skirmish line advanced. & a very brisk skirmishing comenced. & several of the 19th OVI was coming back wounded. & the rebels artillery opened on our artillery. & the balls passed over us. & some balls lit in front of the works a little to our right. & a very heavy cannonading was cept up on our right. & it was said that the rebels was advancing & in a half hour the rebels quit shelling us. & a heavy cannonading comenced on our left. & it cept up very regular. & I think it was the rebels guns on the hill. & ours replying. The skirmishing cept up in our front. But not very heavy. The 19th OVI had 2 men killed & some mortaly wounded & 18 wounded. For two companys was out on skirmish line & they advanced close to the rebels main line of works. & then they had to fall back for the rebels had a cross fire on them. We got word that we could put up our tents. We drawed beef. The word came by a courier that the heavy fighting that we heared on the right was the 20th corps. Advance 1 1/2 or 2 miles. & then just as they was erecting a little works the rebels charged on them & was repulsed with loss. & our men held the line. We saw reinforcements goying to our right to suport the 20th A.C. We retired after 9 P.M. & slept fine.

June 23rd A.D. 1864. we was awaked at 15 minuts after 3 A.M. & told to be ready to go out on skirmish line at 4 A.M. We eat a fiew bites & went out & relieved the 19th O.V.I. & sent our 2 companys went out on the line & the rest was left on reserve & the balls passed over us with force over our works. There was a battery behind the works that we was behind. It was nearly clear. There was considreable cannonading on our left at times. I was sent out on the skirmish line with a detail of men at 11 A.M. & the rebels fired very close to us. As we had nothing but trees to stand behind where I was. & they fired from their works & had a compleat cross fire. So that a man was not sheltered only from the front. There was thick bushes in front of where I was. After noon a brisk cannonading comenced from the top of Kinsew. & at 3 P.M. the regt deployed & came out on the skirmish line. & they said we was goying to advance the skirmish line & I requested to go to my company on the right but was ordered to stay where I was by the officers. & I had to stay where I was with my relief. & not one of my comp was near. & we was then inwith a fiew hundred yards of the rebels mail line of works & they had good skirmish works in front of the main line of works. A little before 4 P.M. a cannon fired in our rear. & at 4 another fired. & a heavy cannonading was goying on on top of Kinsew. & it seamed to me that our men was charging the mountain. For the cannons was used very fast & seemed to be a good many from the roar. & throwing cannester. & our artillery fired a certain number of times in our rear. & then our artillery all along the whole line opened fire. As it was an understanding all along the line. & our artillery played with vigor & rapidity. & the sollid shot passed over us & cut the tree tops off. & when the artillery ceased firing at about half past 4 P.M. the bugle sounded forward. & the yell was raised. & our regt started in the front of our brigade. & the 6th Ky on our left in front of Hasens brigade. & the whole line on our right advanced although the boys did not think it right to advance with only a skirmish line but resolved to do what we could. We sliped forward from tree to tree. & a very brisk firing was comenced all along the line. & our right drove the rebels out of their skirmish works & saw them in their main works. & the rebels charged on our men. & our men saw that they was goyins to be flanked. & they saw at once that they had to fall back. & they started running from tree to tree & as they started the rebels poured a volley into them & I was afterward told that the volley fired just then wounded Captain D. W. Howe. & our boys went to help him back & the rebs halted them & Sergt Chandler of our comp having just finished loading his gun & inloade. He turned & raised his gun. & the rebs that was so close fell to the ground to ceep him from shooting them & by that means they got away. & when our right fell back of us the rebels got nearly back of us & was running. & I told some of the boys of my relief that we would half to fall back a little ways as our right had fell back & left us. & we went back a little ways under a very heavy fire which cut the bushes & leaves very close around us. & we could see the rebs a little to our right trying to flank our men & take them & we poured a cross fire into them. & we soon got out of amunition but had some brought to us by the major & color bearers & the commissioned officers. & I fired till I could not grasp my gun in my hand but had to hold it in my hand by the stalk. Or it would burn my hand. It was so hot that the barrel expanded so that the ball would slip down in the barrel without ramming it sometimes. I fired nearly 200 rounds for I cept an account by the bunches of amunition that I got. We got nearly tired out for it is very tiersom work to be in a brisk fire from the rebs & be buisily engaged firing our guns & all of our rig & rations & knapsack hung to a man. The heavy cannonading had all ceased before sundown. & we could hear a very brisk firing to our right of musketry. & on our left also. & it continued tolerable brisk & the tree that I was behind with 2 others was struck with several balls. & others came very near us. & after 8 P.M. we was relieved by the 9th Ky. & I went in. & to my great surprise I found that my brave young Captain (D.W.Howe) was severly wounded in the right knee. & I never was so sorry of anything in my life that I was not with my own company but it could not be helped then. I had to put up with it but I felt greatly lost to think that all of our Companys commissioned officers was wounded & also to my surprise & sorrow I was told that Edmond Holcroft of our company was killed. He was a good soldier & will be missed by his comrads in the company. & also Walter Hunter was thought to be killed. The last he was seen was at or near the rebs skirmish works when our men fell back. Orderly Sergeant Newton Johnson of comp D was killed. & Sergeant John Stanley of comp D was killed. & Sergeant Paul H. Smith & privat Thomas Wilburn of comp E was killed. & Sergeant Archibald South of comp K was said to be mortaly wounded. & there was about 12 men of our regt got wounded. Some severly. We was marched back to our works that we had built & got supper & retired after 10 P.M. & a little skirmishing was cept up all night. & after the hardest & most dangerous days work that I had ever don I slept tolerable well.

June 24th A.D. 1864. we got up at daylight & still heared skirmishing. & it was a clear warm day. We drawed some cloth. I got a pair of shoes. There was some cannonading all day & skirmishing. It was rumered that the 13th A.C. had come up to our army. I put my time in at writing. I heared from captain he was geting along tolerable well. Lieutenant William Cardel took charge of our Comp. We drawed 3 days rations & a little soaft soap. We retired after 8 P.M. & had a good sleep.

June 25th A.D. 1864. we got up at daylight. There was but little skirmishing on the line. We went to Genl Howards head quarters & got a camp kettle to wash in. I washed & boiled my clothing & patched them as we could not draw all we wanted & needed. We got orders to put up our tents in regular order & poliece the quarters. It was clear & the hotest day I think that we have had this year. Before 10 A.M. a brisk cannonading comenced on the summit of Kinsew. & our batterys replyed. I writ some. At half past 4 P.M. our guns throwed shells on Kenisew & exploaded 3 caissons for the rebels. James C Dunlap went & saw Captain Howe. & he was geting along fine. We drawed beef. The mail came in & went out. We retired after 9 P.M. & lots of balls passed over us during the night.

June 26th A.D. 1864, Sunday._ we got up after daylight. & it was a clear warm day. I writ some. James Cotten was sent to the hospital. The news was that the 13th A.C. had come up & went to our right. & some of the 14th A.C. went to our right. We drawed soap, & some knapsacks & stockings. At 15 minuts till 12 M. our battery to our left a little way opened fire on the rebels & they replyed very quick & fast & cept up cannonading a good deal. A. M. Terhune went & saw Captain Howe. He is geting along fine. We could hear cannonading a good way to our right. It was said that our troops was intending to try to take the railroad on our right. The mail came in. After dark the 11th Ind battery went to our right & front a little ways. & the pioneers built a little fort for them. The guns are 4 20 Pdrs & 2 parrot & two 24 Pdrs howetsers. & the pioneers fixed an entanglement in front of the first line of our works. & was working nearly all night. I was on alarm guard till after midnight.

June 27th A.D. 1864. we got up after daylight & had orders to pack up everything & not strike tents & be ready to move. There was some cannonading on our left & but little skirmishing along the line. We heared cannonading on our right at a distance & our batterys just to our left fired at the rebels. & they replped. & we started at half past 7 A.M. & went to the right. & the whole line was moving to the right along the line of works. We could still hear the cannonading on our right, & in our front a cannon fired once & a while. & it was said that Newtons Division was goying to atack the rebels works & that we was behind them to suport them. The cannonading on our left was very heavy. It was at Kinsew. & at 15 minuts after 9 A.M. our men comenced advancing all along the line for we heard brisk firing. & some wounded men was coming back. At 10 A.M. we heared a little cheering in front & a brisk firing comenced & we advanced a little & stoped. We was suporting Newtons Division. & we saw lots of wounded coming back. & it was said that our men had took the rebels line of skirmish works & was inwith a hundred yards of their main works. & at 15 minuts till 11 A.M. we had to fall back a little way. & we could hear them firing rite brisk on our left & some cannons could be heared all along the line, from our batterys & from the rebels. At 11 1/2 we got orders to go back to our quarters. & we thought that we had bin making a demonstration to draw the rebels while the flanks worked. There was prety hard fighting on the left at Kinsew. It was a very hot day. Elijah Anderson came up. I put my time in at reading. We drawed 3 days rations. In the evening we heared a brisk cannonading. Lt Colonel Oyler had bin taken with something like the sunpain about noon, & I set up with him till midnight.

June 28th A.D. 1864. the sun shun very hot. & we heared cannonading on our right. It was said that Captain Howe was sent to Chattanooga. We got orders to strike tents & put them up in regular stile. We received mail. I received two letters which don me a good deal of good to read. We drawed whiskey. Linsey Stinnet was detailed for litter or stretcher bearer. I writ some. I remembered that just one year ago we started from Murfreesboro Tenn. We got orders to stay in camp & be ready to move to the right if we was neaded. There was some cannonading & skirmishing all day. Lt Colonel S. P. Oyler was sent back for he was very unwell. We drawed beef. We retired after 8 P.M. & we heared a brisk skirmishing on the right. & we expected to be called up but was not. & slept fine. James Hague was sick & very reastless.

June 29th A.D. 1864. we was awaked after 3 A.M. & ordered to get breakfast. I writ some. It was a very hot day. & a great many of our regt was sick. & some was sent to the hospital nearly every day. I put my time in at reading. I comenced reading the testament through. We got orders to go on skirmish line or picket & our regt has but about 190 men for duty. There was considreable cannonading at times during the day at Kinsew. Our batterys can stop the rebels when they start firing by lighting the shells & sollid shot in their forts. There was but little skirmishing in our front. We started out on picket at 7 P.M. & I was sent out on centenal line with our company. & a captain came sliping up to us. & I thought he was a rebel spy & had craweled through the line & I questioned him very close & watched him for a fiew minuts & found that he belonged to Newtons division to the 27th Ill. & was just trying to find the direction of the line to his left. & we did not fire any in the front of our regt. For there was no firing at us by the rebels. But at a distance to our right & left they cept up a brisk skirmishing & at 10 minuts till 2 o'clock in the morning a very brisk skirmishing comenced by volleys on our right a little way. & some of the boys got a little excited at the first fiew minuts but I told them to be calm & cool & not get excited & reserve their fire untill the rebels got very close if it was them advancing. & our regt skirmishers only fired about two shots. & the firing to our right was very heavy firing & it was a perfect roar. & the artillery opened in a fiew minuts after the musketry comenced. I could not help but feal sorry for the many men that was geting killed & wounded. I could not refrain from praying (as I always do when a battle goes off,) for the poor men who was wilting before the very heavy volleys of musketry & loads of cannister. It lasted till 2. & then seemed to be renewed with new vigor. & a roar lasted 10 minuts longer & then ceased at once for one side or the other was repulsed I supose. It comenced raining. We was relieved at daybreak having sit in our little pits all night without a minuts sleap. And reville had sounded before 3 A.M. & we heared a good deal of moving of artillery or something on our right.

June 30th A.D. 1864. we slept a little knap after we got to the reserve. It did not rain but little. Our boys talked with the rebels & traided coffee for tobacco & did not shoot at each other. But it was strictly ordered for them not to talk with each other or exchange papers. Our Division sent a detail of men out under a flag of troos to burry our men that was killed on the 23rd between the two skirmish lines. It rained a little shower. There was but little cannonading to be heared all day. I put my time in at reading. The news in the papers was good. We was relieved & went to camp after 7 P.M. & drawed 3 days rations & some beans & rice. We retired after 9 P.M. & reasted fine.

July 1st A.D. 1864. a very beautiful morning. We had bin awaked once in the night by a very brisk firing on the picket line to our right but it is very quiet this morning. I don some writing. I received two letters. It was very warm. The artillery to our right comenced firing at the rebels at 15 minuts till 7 P.M. & at 7 1/2 P.M. the artillery in our front & to our left fired. & we heared the report of the cannonading a great way to our left. We was expecting to leave & go to our left. We did not move to the left. We retired after 9 P.M. & reasted fine.

July 2nd A.D. 1864. I was awaked by cannons. & I heared the cannons all along the line to our right & left & to our front. & the rebels did not reply that I heared. Our skirmishers yelled & some skirmishing was heared, till 10 A.M. it was all still with the exceptions of a fiew shots. I writ some. It rained a little. I don some sewing & reading. & I received two letters. One was hard to bear. It was from the one who loves me. We got orders to be ready to move. But not strike tents till we got further orders. we got orders to strike tents at 7 1/2 P.M. ~ we started & went to our left about a mile. it rained. We relieved some of the 14th A.C. & took the front line & sent out skirmishers. & the rebs balls came very close. We tryed to sleap with all our traps on in the wet muddy ditch or up on the bank where it was dangerous.

 

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